Starfish
This Green Star Polyps data sheet gives you basic information about the common names, scientific names and water parameters required by this species. In addition, you can find Green Star Polyps information such as diet, determining sex, breeding, distribution and compatibility.
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Green Star Polyps (Soft Corals)

 

Classification: Pachyclavularia spp.

 

Coral Type : Soft Corals

 

Common Name: Green Star Polyps

 

Alt Common Name: Star Polyps, Purple Star Polyps, White Star Polyps, Grass Coral, Daisy Polyps

 

Distribution: Indo Pacific, Phillipines

 

Lighting Requirements : Low to high - this coral tolerates many types of lighting including normal output flourescent, power compact, VHO, T5 or metal halide.

 

Aggression: High. Although the coral does not have a stinging capability, it's encrusting growth pattern can lead to rapid encroachment on its neighbors. Mat can be pruned with scissors if it starts to get out of hand. This is one of those corals that some hobbyist regret ever putting in their tank.

 

Hardiness: This coral is quite hardy and great for beginners. It does better with higher water flow.

 

Growth Pattern : Proficient growing - spreads out across live rock or substrate in a tentacle like manner.

 

Nutrition: This species thrives primarily on Zooxanthellate and light.

 

Supplements Required: None required.

 

Care Difficulty: 1/10

   
Very Easy
Moderate
Very Difficult

 

Water Flow Requirements :

     
None
Low
Moderate
High

 

Temperature Range: 75°F - 82°F

     
74
76
78
80
82
84

 

Additional Information : Green Star polyps are small bright green polyps connected together by a rubbery purple colored mat. Open during the day, retracted at night or when disturbed.

 

Propagation Information : Green Star polyps are easily propagated by cutting a section of the purple mat from the main colony using scissors or similar. This mat can be attached to a suitable substrate such as a piece of live rock usually with a rubber band. It will quickly attach to the rock and the rubber band can be removed.

 

Toxicity Information : Not toxic in nature.

 

 

 

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